5 Results

Lawyers Disagree on Reform as Mexico’s Broken Legal System Persists

Region: Mexico

Topics: CorruptionJobsLegal RightsPower

Many lawyers in Mexico agree that the country’s legal system is badly in need of reform: Mexico ranks fourth in the world for impunity, and corruption is rampant. As lawyers grapple with how to hold colleagues accountable, the broken legal system continues to take a devastating toll.

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Mexico City’s Street Musicians Seek Legal Recognition to Protect 600-Year-Old Tradition

Region: Mexico

Topics: ArtsInnovationLegal Rights

Musicians who perform on Mexico City’s streets are often harassed by police. Now, a group of them have formed a collective, seeking legal recognition of public performance spaces.

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They’re Banned, But Mototaxis Get People in Mexico City Where They Need To Go

Region: Mexico

Topics: Legal Rights

Mototaxis, or motorcycles with trailers attached, are a popular form of transportation in Mexico City, even though the government forbade their use two years ago.

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Usual Rent Deals in Buenos Aires Force Many Into Informal Settlements

Region: Argentina

Topics: InfrastructureLegal Rights

Rents in many informal settlements in Buenos Aires are just as high as rents in the city’s safer districts, which boast better utilities. But many have no choice but to live in the former, because rental contracts in the latter demand costly down payments beyond the reach of many locals.

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Parents in Prison, Children at Risk: A Mexican Family’s Two-Year Ordeal

Region: Mexico

Topics: Legal Rights

An illiterate, indigenous couple say they were coerced into confessing in the murder of the husband's brother. They spent about two years in prison before their release, but the lives of their seven children were upended nearly as much - they shuttled among the homes of relatives, friends - even one of their teachers. In the family's lawsuit against the state, a judge found that authorities had utterly disregarded laws and directives to care for the children of those in prison.

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